Tuesday, 13 February 2018

Big Mandarin is Watching You

China is known as the "sleeping superpower", yet in the last few decades it has risen and is now wide awake. It is still nominally run under the principles of Maoist socialism, yet it has embraced the global corporatist economy to become the world's leading industrial power, surpassing the ailing twentieth century dominance of the United States of America. Like all nations with the appearance of overt power, it is still merely a puppet colony of hidden globalist rulers. Both in its modern era and in the pre-revolutionary imperial days, China has been controlled by the "Li" Illuminati bloodline. Recently the government has published a document with a title typical of Chinese Newspeak: "Planning Outline for the Construction of a Social Credit System". The objective is to assess every one of China's one-point-three billion people, almost a quarter of the world's population, and find out what "kind of citizen" they are. China has a long history of state intrusiveness into people's personal lives; yet modern technology has allowed it vastly to increase its indulgence for this penchant. Criteria for calculating a person's "social credit score" are what you buy in shops, what you buy online, where you spend your free time, who your friends are, how many hours a week you spend watching TV, gaming or surfing the net; and much much more. The Social Credit System will use a gargantuan electronic database and will be up and running by 2020 according to the director of the scheme Li Yingyun. "Someone who plays video games for ten hours a day, for example, would be considered an idle person." he said. That's obviously true, yet why is it the government's concern if that is the case? Why is it the government's job to force them to change their ways when such idleness tends to bring its own punishments; difficulty finding work, annoying your family etc? Source: http://www.wired.co.uk/article/chinese-government-social-credit-score-privacy-invasion.

Such power to poke their noses into people's lives will inevitably lead to methods of enforcement that would be unthinkable in earlier generations. We may have a situation in which, for example, if somebody fails a fitness test they could be charged extra to buy cigarettes or unhealthy food. There could even be a set of weighing scales underneath the doormat of fast food outlets that will calculate surcharges for obese customers. I'm sure many people will see the sense in this and that it's only out of concern for people's health and the cost of their medical treatment to the state; however this very patriarchal attitude by the government towards the people tends to end in tyranny. If you let "big daddy government" sort everything out for you excesses are inevitable. As Benjamin Franklin said: "Those who would trade in freedom for stability will lose both and deserve neither." You might argue that all this would be very difficult, or even impossible, because people will just simply return to using cash wherever they go; but what about when there is no cash? There are many experiments into cashless economies going on right now, see the background links below. Naturally this new policy will not stop at the borders of China either. China will just be a first stage towards a worldwide electronic control grid in which the lives of individual citizens will be nothing more than lines of code in a machine. The country's vast population will make it far easier to expand to the rest of the globe. Therefore it is essential that we resist. We must refuse to submit to the first stages of the control system, no matter how "convenient" it might appear to make our lives.
And: https://hpanwo-voice.blogspot.co.uk/2012/07/cash-in-hand-traders-under-attack.html.

18 comments:

paul rawes said...

A really excellent article, my friend!

Ben Emlyn-Jones said...

Thanks, Paul :-)

Adam the Data Man said...

Are there not some positives to this? A benign collectivist state could improve the health and wellbeing of its citizens through smart personal data capture. I work as a health analyst for a regional data observatory and granularity of multiple data is key to identifying NEED.I have also peer reviewed evaluations of CCTV and target hardening measures and how this impacts on fear of crime and recidivism. Surveillance not only significantly reduces fear of crime particularly for certain groups (elderly people and women for example) but also many ex offenders cite prevalence of CCTV as a reason for desistance of offending. You see when we have passive type deterrence mechanisms like CCTV then we don't need to engage the strong arm of the police who only intervene when it's too late. You should consider both sides, but I bet you don't. Cheers, Adam

Ben Emlyn-Jones said...

Yes I do. I also know that the idea of giving excessive power to state to protect people from dangers, real or perceived, has happened many times and has always resulted in disaster. There are many other solutions to the problems you list that are economic and community led.

Adam the Data Man said...

OK matey what are all these community safety solutions to reduce fear of crime in public space and promote offending cessation, oh and to detect offenders as CCTV does? Presumably they are evidence based?

Adam the Data Man said...

Also matey what are all these disasters you speak of specifically on CCTV and crime deterrence and detection? Must all these effective measures be so apocolyptic in your eyes? The lives of victims, potential victims and the lives of offenders who go straight have been massively improved thanks to CCTV.Perhaps we should flood the streets with police instead? Or maybe youd prefer no police at all?

Ben Emlyn-Jones said...

Disasters? There's the various Homeland Security legislation in the USA. The Nazi state taking action to protect people as a pretext for great state power. As for community solutions. Changes in architecture. building homes with larger windows and more open space has proved more effective than CCTV. The police vs local youths football matches. Happier environments of various kinds. There are plenty of societies on earth with very low crime rates together with minimal government supervision. You asked: "Perhaps we should flood the streets with police instead? Or maybe you'd prefer no police at all?". Is it really that black and white? Is it really a case of either-or?

Ben Emlyn-Jones said...

Adam the Data Man said: "I don't think you know anything about community safety nor do you care about it..." I'm afraid rudeness like that from you means the end of our conversation. Good day.

Dale said...

Hi again Ben, great blog dude. Im torn though because I think Adam is right in some ways. Can we have low crime societies as you say Ben without CCTV etc? I mean societies like ours? Cheers. Dale Richardson

Ben Emlyn-Jones said...

Thanks, Dale. Yes I do. Indeed it has been done, both in the UK and abroad. The idea that we need state surveillance to protect us from ourselves is propaganda by people who want state surveillance for completely different reasons.

Dean said...

Hi Ben, nice blog. Could you elaborate on your last comment please as you are generalising somewhat. Thank you. Your Roswell books are great!

Regards

Dean

Dale said...

Cheers for that Ben. I always enjoy your work. Are you saying that CCTV doesn't work to reduce crime or deter criminals? Very interesting if the PtB just pretend as they have other motives. What countries are low in crime without CCTV or draconian policing and judicial punishment would you say? Cheers

Ben Emlyn-Jones said...

Thanks, Dean. But in what way am I generalizing?

Ben Emlyn-Jones said...

Dale, I never said CCTV doesn't work to reduce crime and deter criminals. What I object to is the idea that it is the one and only solution to civilization's destruction. St Helena is a good example of a place with zero CCTV and a very low crime rate. Areas with formerly high crime rates have had them reduced by non-CCTV methods, including my own home in Oxford.

Dale said...

Hi, thank you very much. St Helena does i think though have a tiny close knit population and probably has about two policemen. I think crime is a big problem in all cities in the world and I personally hate the fascist police so if CCTV works to stop crime I would prefer that to having pigs everywhere. Cheers Ben. Dale

Dean said...

Is St Helena and Oxford really the best examples, nothing in N.America say? I don't like all this walking on eggshells around you in case you take offence at the slightest thing.

Regards

Dean

Ben Emlyn-Jones said...

Dale, actually the police have been very positive in Oxford. They set up a football league of police teams vs local youths. It really lifted our spirits.

Ben Emlyn-Jones said...

Dean, are you The same bloke under a new name? Adam the Data Man? you sound exactly like him.